Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11144/5659
Title: The New Work Culture of the Gig Economy - An analysis of how the gig economy is altering employment prospects and extending talent pools
Authors: Rodrigues, José Noronha
Bhattacharya, Sumanta
Cabete, Dora Cristina Ribeiro
Keywords: Gig economy
India
Issue Date: Nov-2022
Publisher: OBERVARE. Universidade Autónoma de Lisboa
Citation: Rodrigues, José Noronha; Bhattacharya, Sumanta; Cabete, Dora Cristina Ribeiro (2022). The New Work Culture of the Gig Economy - An analysis of how the gig economy is altering employment prospects and extending talent pools. Notes and Reflections in Janus.net, e-journal of international relations. Vol. 13, Nº 2, Novembro 2022-Abril 2023. Consultado [em linha] em data da última consulta, https://doi.org/10.26619/1647-7251.13.2.03
Abstract: India has a sizable population that engages in the gig economy, which is supported by a developing digital platform. The gigs consist of temporary, freelance, or sharing economy positions. But the gig economy is expanding as a result of the epidemic and the growing trend of working from home. There is no sign that it will slow down when it integrates into the larger economy. It is the outcome of a sizable technological, artificial intelligence, and machine learning progress. As of 2019, some of the most popular platforms in India include Zomato, Swiggy, Uber, BigBasket, and Foodpanda.
Peer Reviewed: no
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11144/5659
metadata.dc.identifier.doi: https://doi.org/10.26619/1647-7251.13.2.03
ISSN: 1647-7251
Appears in Collections:OBSERVARE - JANUS.NET e-journal of International Relations. Vol.13, n.2 (November 2022 - April 2023)

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